~Mountain Roots Orchard available plants and trees~

Annual & Perennial Plants

Each June, we grow a small selection of annual garden starts such as, Cabbage, Chard, Pepper, and Tomatoes.  For perennial plants, we grow and select varieties that are native or have acclimated to Idaho’s climate and will thrive in zones 3-5.   This can include plants such as Red Osier Dogwood, Serviceberry, Mountain Ash, Syringa, Lilac, Woods Rose, and edible perennials like Asparagus, Blueberries, Raspberries, Rhubarb, and Strawberries.   There is also a selection of herbs and flowers chosen for their usefulness to providing habitat for pollinators and beneficial insects.  

The list of trees below is a variety we’ve selected from St Lawrence Nurseries.  They will all do well in our local climate.  Each tree will range from 2-4′.  These are potted plants in 3 gal. grow bags which you can care for in a protected location until you are ready to plant.  We recommend planting in the fall or spring.  More information about St. Lawrence Nursery can be found thru the following link.

Apple Trees available for 2021 Season

Black Oxford:  Great for eating, cooking, cider and drying! Very hard when picked;
the fruit will be at its best after a few months in storage. Tends toward
biennial bearing.  Ripens in Oct-Nov.  Hardy to -50 or colder

Blue Pearmain:  Medium to large fruit is mild and aromatic, with firm, dense flesh.
Will keep in common storage until January.  Good for eating & keep well.  Ripens in Oct-Nov. Hardy to -50

Canada Baldwin:  The flesh is white, tinged with red/pink. This apple is juicy, excellent
for fresh eating, and for cider. Bears annually; heavy cropper. Not related to Baldwin.  Ripens Sept-Oct.  Hardy to -50

Cortland:  The white flesh is slow to discolor on exposure to air. A good all around apple, favored for cooking and cider. Annual bearer. Ripens Sept-Oct. Hardy to -40

Milwaukee:  Excellent keeper. Flavorful and slightly tart. Good for cooking and
cider, & sauce. Bears annually and produces at a young age.  Ripens Oct-Nov.  Hardy to -50 or colder

Original McIntosh:  Grafted in direct line from the original McIntosh tree growing just
over the river from St. Lawrence Nurseries in Dundas county, Ontario
by John McIntosh in 1796.  Large fruit, good for eating and juicing, sells well at markets. Ripens Sept-Oct.  Hardy to -50 

Pharaoh:  A large, tasty all purpose apple found locally. Unknown parentage,
but likely old varieties. Productive, good for baking, cider, & eating. Ripens Sep-Oct.  Hardy to -50

St.Edmund’s Russet:  Earliest russet. Very juicy and flavorful; makes excellent cider. Listed
among the 6 best apples grown in England.  Ripens Oct-Nov.  Hardy to -50  

Sunrise:  Unique pear/grape flavor. Good eating apple!  Ripens Sept-Oct.  Hardy to -40

Tolman Sweet:  A hard, sweet-fleshed apple. The tree is long lived and a strong grower. A good keeper. Ripens Oct-Nov.  Hardy to -50

Wealthy:  Tasty when fresh picked, and well-suited for sauce and other home
processing. Tree stays small and is a heavy bearer. Sells well at the market.  Ripens Oct-Nov.  Hardy to -50

Westfield Seek-No-Further:  It flourishes in well-drained, gravelly, or loamy soil. Flesh
is rich-tasting and pleasantly aromatic. A great all-purpose apple! Ripens Sept-Oct.  Hardy to -50

Wodarz:  A joint release of N. Dakota and the R.L. Wodarz family. Green and knobbly, this “ugly”
apple is very sweet and stores well. Somewhat tolerant to fireblight.  Ripens Oct-Nov.  Hardy to -50 or colder

Wolf River:  Very large and shapely, attractive variety. Good cooker, highly
favored for pies and crisps! Ripens Sept-Oct.  Hardy to -50 or colder

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